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Colours of Impressionism: Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay

RAD LIFE

Colours of Impressionism: Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay

jenny qian

Introducing the Colours of Impressionism: Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay, The Art Gallery of South Australia will be showcasing 65 Impressionism masterpieces from the 29th of March.

All the way from the Musée d’Orsay in Paris, these renowned masterpieces have been glazed, carefully packaged in crates specially made for each painting, and safely flown to Adelaide. It's suffice to say, The Art Gallery of South Australia is incredibly lucky to house these masterpieces for four months. Rarely do the Musée d’Orsay lend their Monets and Renoirs to other galleries.

Impressionism is one of the most significant art movements to ever exist, mainly known for its emergence into the modern era of art. From the Parisian boulevards to lush, scenic landscapes, this movement is known for capturing everyday life in Paris during the 19th century.

Walking through the exhibition is a magical experience that illustrates the revolution of Impressionism through colour. The way in which shape, form and movement can be manipulated by colour and techniques is truly something spectacular.

Each room of the art gallery is meticulously sectioned into significant periods of the Impressionism movement, depicting the gradual changes that led to modern art.

The first room depicts the use of black in the earliest stages of Impressionism. Just coming out from the Renaissance, black and earth tones depicted the lives of the ordinary in France.

 A Burial at Ornans by Gustave Courbet

A Burial at Ornans by Gustave Courbet

As you move along to the second room, snowy landscapes fill the walls. This is where the renowned landscape painting The Magpie, by Claude Monet humbly resides.

 The Magpie by Claude Monet

The Magpie by Claude Monet

Gallery room 3B depicts the period of 1840s, where artists were able to paint outside with the invention of paints in metallic tubes. Landscapes of rich scenery fill this room. With more scientific knowledge on the physics of colour, artists became bolder with their techniques and use of colours. Developments in chemistry also allowed for Impressionists to expand their colour palettes. In their lush landscape paintings, artists now dared to add nuances of pink reflections and bluesy shadows.

 Regattas at Argenteuil by Claude Monet

Regattas at Argenteuil by Claude Monet

From Impressionism, ‘Neo-Impressionism’ emerged. Whilst this new movement followed the colours and themes of the Impressionism movement, these artists strayed away from the ephemeral treatments of their subjects. One technique that transpired from this movement is pointillism, apparent in Paul Signac’s work, where images were broken in tiny dots of colour.

 The Papal Palace by Paul Signac

The Papal Palace by Paul Signac

The final room of the gallery features paintings of the colours rose and violet. Instead of employing colour to depict realism, these soft tones were usually used as an expression of mood.

 The Hydrangea by Berthe Morisot

The Hydrangea by Berthe Morisot

Overall, not only was the exhibition a sight for sore eyes, but something more significant in art history.

During the emergence of Impressionism, artists such as the likes of Monet, Renoi, Manet and Signac were considered deviants of society. Their paintings were ostracised from academic institutions such as The French Academy of Fine Arts, and many of these artists struggled in their careers. However, these Impressionists defied ordinary conventions and stuck to the art they believed in, creating a radical departure from tradition.

The meticulous walkthrough of the exhibition shows each defining moment in the Impressionism era that led to the eventual arrival of modern art.

Not only is this exhibition a selection of renowned paintings, but a celebration of artistic freedom that these Impressionists fought for.

Colours of Impressionism: Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay will run at the Art Gallery of South Australia from 29th March to 29th of July 2018.

For more information, visit their website HERE

 

All images via WikiArt